Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre
MICHAEL
BALLAM
FOUNDING GENERAL
DIRECTOR
Click to view Events Calendar
HISTORY OF UFOMT
ELLEN ECCLES THEATRE
DANSANTE BUILDING
UTAH THEATRE
MICHAEL BALLAM
MUSIC & THE MIND
TRAVEL WITH MICHAEL BALLAM
MISSION STATEMENT
PAST SEASONS
AUDITIONS
FESTIVAL ARTIST PROGRAM
JOBS
GUILD
VOLUNTEER
STAFF DIRECTORY
UFOMT BOARDS
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
NATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD
PURCHASE TICKETS
PRICING & SEATING
GROUP RATES
GIFT CERTIFICATES
EVENTS CALENDAR
POLICIES
DONATE
GUILD
VOLUNTEER
VERA SCAMMON MEMORIAL FUND
OPERA BY CHILDREN
TEACHER IN ATTENDANCE
UTAH FESTIVAL ACADEMY
ACADEMY CLASSES
LITERARY SEMINARS
YOUTH CONSERVATORY
UTAH HIGH SCHOOL
MUSICAL THEATER AWARDS
PARTICIPATION
PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS
UFOMT INTERNSHIP
AT THE FESTIVAL
DRIVING & PARKING
ETIQUETTE
AREA INFORMATION
ACCOMMODATIONS
RESTAURANTS
THINGS TO DO
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
ARTICLES
PLAYBILL ADVERTISING
SETS
EVENTS CALENDAR
2015 SUMMER SEASON
UTAH FESTIVAL ACADEMY
ACADEMY CLASSES
LITERARY SEMINARS
INSIDE THE FESTIVAL
BACKSTAGE TOURS
BREAKFAST WITH THE STARS
INFORMANCES
TABERNACLE CONCERTS
CAFE DES ARTISTES
FESTIVAL BOUTIQUE
WHAT'S PLAYING?
OPERAS & MUSICALS
MAN OF LA MANCHA
Jul 11 - Aug 8, 2015
Purchase Tickets
HOW TO SUCCEED
Jul 10 - Aug 8, 2015
Purchase Tickets
LA BOHÈME
Jul 8 - Aug 7, 2015
Purchase Tickets
CAROUSEL
Jul 9 - Aug 7, 2015
Purchase Tickets
SPECIAL PERFORMANCES
& CONCERTS
THE PIANISTS!
Jul 11, 2015
Purchase Tickets
INT'L OPERA COMP.
Jul 15 & 29, 2015
Purchase Tickets
TRIBUTE TO RODGERS
Jul 22, 2015
Purchase Tickets
CARMINA BURANA
Aug 5, 2015
Purchase Tickets
ArtTix

MEDICAL

MUSIC & THE MIND

Pre-natal |

Anthony De Casper of the University of North Carolina has shown that fetuses store in their memories complex songs that are sung to them daily during the last trimester. After delivery, babies respond with increased attention to these familiar songs. The Times-Picayune 3/13/95

 

Babies |

"What the hospitals have noticed, says Woodford, is that restless babies, even some babies in pain following surgery, will nod off to sleep, sometimes as soon as the tape is turned on. Hospitals are not generally the most comforting of places, notes Woodford. There are too many frightful procedures, too many strangers, too many alarms and beepers and TV sets, all creating a "Startle effect." But lullabies and heartbeats are calming, even in the worst of situations, he says. More than 30, 000 of the tapes have been stolen from US hospitals since they were first introduced seven years ago, says Woodford, who now has begun selling the tapes at selected stores, including J.C. Penney stores in Utah. More than 4, 500 hospital and care facilities are now using the tapes. Nursing homes, he says, have found them helpful in calming down Alzheimer's patients." Elaine Jarvik, Deseret News.


 

Pain Relief |

Half an hour of music produced the same effect as 10 milligrams of Valium ... Critical care unit of Baltimore's St. Agnes Hospital. Aspire, Lisa Dionne, April 1995.


 

Coma |

'Music as Medicine" (Ensign) Last summer 18 year old Matt Tullis of Sandy, Utah, had already received his mission call to Belgium when he was in a violent car accident that killed two of his high school buddies and sent him to the University of Utah Medical Center in a serious coma due to massive head injuries. While his friends and family hovered outside his room in a shaken silence, the doctors gave him only a 25% chance to five. A bolt in his head monitored the pressure as his brain swelled. "We were told," said Julie, Matt's mother, "that if the pressure in his skull rose above 15 ICP's or got as high as 30 for any length of time, it was very dangerous." Medically, the doctors could get the pressure down to about 15, but they couldn't do any better. So the lanky basketball player lay for two days without the pressure dropping below 15. Then his younger sister, Emily, and father, Howard, got an idea as they visited him for a few moments in intensive care. Because Matt loves church music, they started to sing "Because I Have Been Given Much." Immediately, the monitor registered a dramatic drop in pressure, plunging from 15 down to 4. With the family crying and the nurses amazed, they put a tape in for him, Kenneth Cope's "Greater Than Us All", and his pressure continued around 8 or 9 for the next few hours, which was the critical time. "We felt that somewhere in his coma, he could hear that music and know that we were there and the Lord was there for him," said Julie. After nineteen days in a coma and three months in the hospital, Matt is home recuperating, hoping he can go on that mission next year. P.S. Matt is fulfilling a mission to San Bernardino, Riverside. (according to the granddaughter of woman who wrote me said she saw two men in white seated at his side as he spoke in a Stake meeting there.)


 

Stress Reduction |

The US Senate hearing on the effects of music on the health of the elderly in 1991, more doctors believe that certain types of music reduce stress and decrease healing time and the need for prescription medication. Music is being used to treat everyone from Alzheimer's patients to premature newborns to prisoners. Music is a tool in the treatment and prevention of diseases, mental illness and physical disabilities. Maude Blair, Sacramento Bee July 26, 1995 G-1-3


 

Paralysis |

Cheryl Davidsen, Mountain View, Alberta, Canada 403-653-2352 wrote "The Gentle Touch" to praise God and voice was restored.


Tom Haldane, had stroke 10 years ago, paralyzing his left side unable to walk and talk, but learned to play the saxophone again, and recovered. Nov 5, 1995 The Times Picayune, 3F2

Colorado State Univ; testing on Stroke victims measuring musical activity in their legs and timing of their strides as they walked to a rhythmic dance piece. Over four weeks significant improvement in stride-symmetry was seen when the patients walked to musical accompaniment. In almost every case Says Michael Thaut director of the center, "the timing of the strides improved with music. A 70 yr old stroke victim at Beth Abraham Hospital in New York City lost his ability to speak. One day, therapist Connie Tomaino played an old Jewish folk song on her accordion, the man hummed. She played it regularly and he began to sing. Before you knew it he was talking.

 

Alzheimer's |

Alzheimer patients who do not know the year or their children's names can remember the words to favorite songs. Clapping and singing, with none of the usual listlessness or disorientation common to their disease, they seem completely normal, as if the music has infused them with its own joy and coherence. ...Stroke silenced members of the center's orchestra will come to life, the chiming of struck bells, the throbbing of pounding drums expressing feelings that can no longer be conveyed in words. Utah State University, Sounds of Healing by Lynnette Harris, Fall 1995


Greenwalt Alzheimer Choir, which practices every week in New Orleans. Even though some of the singers can't remember where they live or what day it is, even though they often have difficulty finding the -right page in their songbooks, they are able to recall the words to old songs and learn the words to new ones. We're seeing bonding, less depression, their human spirit is still there. The Times-Picayune Dec 10, 1995 Sheila Stroup call 461-5889

 

Dyslexia |

"The playing of baroque or classical music can arrest the symptoms of dyslexia at least long enough to allow the individual to utilize or express other interest or abilities which he might not be able to do otherwise. In essence, music formats the brain for success in other areas. Contact: Carol: 2208 Carol Sue Ave, Terrytown, LA 70056 504-392-3299


 

DNA Equivalent |

Dr. Susumu Ohno, a geneticist at the Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope in Duarte, California believes that the elements of nature have a unique series of organized identifying pitches. He assigned a musical pitch to the elements (do) cytosine, (re mi) adenine, (fa sol) guanine (la ti) thymine, that exist in creatures, thereby making melodies. All creatures have different melodies. When played before professional musician, they believed them to be melodies created by Bach, Brahms, Chopin and other masters because of their intricacies and organization. Even cancer cells have their own "melodies" The Body of Music Chapter 13 page 141 "Meaning and Medicine" Larry Dossey, MD Bantam


 

What Doctors Do For Fun -- The Caduceus Jazz Ensemble |

What are Springfield, Missouri doctors doing in their "spare" time? Playing big band music! To be more exact, 15 physicians and to medical administrators get together for a weekly evening practice. For many of them, this may be at the end of a 14 our workday. The genesis of this group was the need for some entertainment at the annual Smith-Glynn-Calloway Clinic employee's Christmas party. Dr. Rod Geter and Dr. Joel Waxman came up with the idea of a band. Among 80 physicians on the clinic staff, there were enough musicians to form a 14 piece band. Dr. Mike Wooten, of the trumpet section, commented after the first performance: "the best thing we did was play real loud." Other performances soon followed: One at a nursing home and another at a World War II block party benefit for the Heart Association. The group was initially conducted by Dr. Rod Geter until Dan Palen of Palen Music Store, agreed to become the musical director. Due to the nature of the medical practice and because band members cannot always be where they're supposed to be at a specified time, there are backup players for many of the positions in the band. One of the complications of rehearsals is the beeping of pagers -- an unavoidable interruption. Just what benefits are there for the members of the group? For one thing, it's just plain fun to play the music of the big band era. In a medical community the size of Springfield, these doctors might otherwise not have the chance to be acquainted with each other if not through the common bond of their love for music.


 
ORDER BY PHONE | 800.262.0074 ext 3
Box Office
FESTIVAL SPONSORS
Cache County - Rapz and Restaurant Taxes FM100 George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation KSL
MediaOne National Endowment for the Arts Utah Division of Arts & Museums Utah - Life Elevated

©2014 Utah Festival Opera & Musical Theatre. All rights reserved.  |  Privacy Policy  |  Site Map